Most Venomous Snakes in the US – Deadliest Snakes in North America

Prev1 of 4
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse

The chances of dying from a venomous snakebite in the United States are essentially zero. Fewer than one in 37,000 people are bitten by a venomous snake in the U.S. each year at less than 8,000 bites per year, and only one in 50 million people will die from a snakebite.

Did you know that you are nine times more likely to die from being struck by lightning than to die of a venomous snake bite?

Although with the aid of modern medicine, snakes in the US are not particularly dangerous to humans, none of these snakes should be taken lightly, nor should they be irrationally feared. Let’s get to know them.Let’s get started. But, before we start, take a moment to like and subscribe for more fun, fauna facts.

Let’s get started. But, before we start, take a moment to like and subscribe for more fun, fauna facts.

  1. The Rattlesnakes
Rattlesnake

The Rattlesnake is the most widespread group of venomous snake in the US. They inhabit almost all types of habitats. This group of snakes is comprised of 32 species and at least 83 subspecies, making them the most diverse group of reptiles in the US.

The Mojave rattlesnake is the deadliest of all rattlesnakes. These rattlesnakes are aggressive toward humans and will bite without provocation. Although rattlesnake venom isn’t as deadly as some other snakes’, the volume of the injected venom makes rattlesnakes particularly dangerous. The venom is hemotoxic, meaning that it prevents blood from clotting and destroys tissue. Relatives of the Mojave rattler include the Eastern Diamondback, Western Diamondback, Sidewinder, Timber, Rock, and Pygmy rattlesnakes. Known for their distinctive rattle at the end of the tail, rattlesnakes can strike at amazing distances and catch their victims by surprise.

The Western Diamondback can reach up to 7 feet in length, while Pygmy Rattlers, sometimes called Leaf Rattlers can reach a fully grown length of as little as 16 inches.

Prev1 of 4
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*